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The description reads:

With compact bodies and simple functionality, classic 35 mm cameras paved the way for both amateur photographers and professional photojournalists everywhere. The first was prototyped in Germany in 1913 and went into production as the Leica in 1924. Our collection of found cameras crafted by a variety of mid-century German and Russian manufacturers have become vintage icons, making them perfect for display. Each one is unique; let us choose for you.

  • Each bears the rare character and timeworn beauty of a vintage piece.
  • Cameras are usable as well as decorative.
  • Catalog / Internet only

Wow.

So let me get this straight.  You can fork over $149 and let Pottery Barn choose the perfect vintage camera to suit your perfectly vintage-inspired abode. And lo! not only are they great for display, the cameras are actually “usable.” For those of us just a tad too lazy to pop over to ebay and find these exact same Zorki 4K cameras for less than half of what PB is charging.  I guess the extra surcharge covers their curation fee.

mum & mom


© Hee Jin Kang 2010

tornado, trees, queens


© Hee Jin Kang

iphone = fav


© Hee Jin Kang

summertime pix

a fire, then surprise

Last week we woke up to a fire three doors down!  10 firetrucks! 100 firemen!

Thankfully no one was hurt.  The building took a beating though.

Then we went to Surprise, NY for the fourth of July.

Surprise is near Climax.  I bought this lime-green panther lamp.  It looks better than it looks.


All photos © Hee Jin Kang 2010

UPDATE: Here’s a youtube link of the fire.  See that green building on the right – that’s us!

no sleep fridays


© Hee Jin Kang
“No Sleep” is a series of photographs of abandoned mattresses found around New York City, though mostly in Brooklyn. The beds are sometimes seedy and sometimes luminous, pathetic, monolithic and architectural, strange, out-of-place and totally banal. I’m interested in how these beds present all those things we do on them — sleep, dream, make love — and how by dumping them onto the streets of New York, we bring our very private lives out into the light.  More here.